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Coaching Individuals & Teams

Posted by on Feb 23, 2016 in Home Page Posts, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Coaching Individuals & Teams

Helping top leaders achieve their highest and best potential when stepping into new roles, facing new challenges, or breaking through barriers.  

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Five Career Benefits of Gratitude (Say Thank You)

Posted by on Nov 25, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

I  love to celebrate with family and friends, love turkey and all the other stuff, and enjoy having a reason to be intentional about being grateful. Now I’ve found that gratitude is good for my business, as well as a whole bunch of other things it’s good for, like health… and sleep. Better Management:  While most managers are familiar with being critical of their employees, gratitude has been found to be an agent of change.  Multiple research studies indicate that specific and directed praise and gratitude for a job well done is a powerful motivator. Better Networks:  Gratitude has shown up in the research as increasing our ability to connect with others.  Those demonstrating more gratitude were able to build more social capital, important in today’s world of collaboration, job change and interwoven business webs. Goal Achievement:  People who keep gratitude journals are more likely to achieve set goals, according to research.  Gratitude journals may focus attention and build motivation by seeing what’s possible, rather than what’s not. Decision Making:  Gratitude has been demonstrated to increase the diagnostic skill of doctors in several research studies.  Decision making requires brain energy and has been shown to be improved by positive moods.  In one study giving doctors  a lollipop has increased their ability to be more attentive and consider more diagnostic choices (even though they weren’t able to eat the lollipop until afterwards, so it wasn’t the sugar.) Productivity:  Gratitude improves self-esteem and confidence, which in turn improves our ability to focus and get things done. I had a practice of keeping a gratitude journal before I went to bed – 10 things I was grateful for that day.  I haven’t done it recently, but writing this blog post is motivating me to start again. If these aren’t enough reasons to consciously practice gratitude, look at this diagram of the benefits from The Happier...

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My Obituary Photo and Leadership Growth

Posted by on Jul 11, 2014 in Change, Competence, Self-awareness, Uncategorized | 0 comments

I’ve noticed that my local paper often contains obituary photos of young people… who have died in their 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Why use a photo so separate from today’s reality?  That got me thinking about who I am today versus the person I was in my twenties, when I first became a leader. Please don’t put her photo on my obituary. She is not me, anymore. Coincidentally, this week I ran into a person I knew some years ago, when I owned my real estate brokerage business called The Property Shop, and a land development business called Sterling Tern Realty Trust. She asked me if I am still with the builders association. I have remained that person to her, for my changes are more visible to me and not, perhaps, so visible to others.  And yet, that is not me, anymore, though she is still a part of me. I have saved my old business cards over the years.  The ones from my real estate days all have photos.  Over the course of a decade, I started out working for others and then for myself.  These cards and their photos provide me a physical representation of my growth in competency and maturity.  I treasure them for that.  But I am not those people anymore, though they are a part of me. The learning came with bumps and bruises – both my own and others.  I was not a good leader at first, although certainly I tried. Last week someone said to me that leadership cannot be taught.  The situation did not allow for a rebuttal but oh how I disagreed, and how well I articulated why in my head.   I know clearly what I have learned, and how hard won those learnings were. I finished a coaching engagement with a C-suite executive client this week and during our closing assessment together when I asked him what he wished I had done differently.  He said “I wish you had come into my career twenty years ago.”  He had learned an enormous amount about himself as a leader and about leadership in general in the time we worked together.  Will his bosses be open to seeing that growth?  Or are the changes more visible to him and in spite of how he interacts with the organization and his staff will his bosses have a fixed view and see him as he was?  Does he need to tell them?  He is not that man, anymore. In another instance this week, a client who has been in her role less than a year was frustrated with her lack of clarity about the large organization she had joined, part of an industry that was new for her.  But after she shared the reactions of others to her vision and her plan for the future, I was certain she had great clarity.  She could articulate her vision clearly, and everyone with whom she had communicated had agreed with it.  She had clarity, but...

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